New seats let airlines squeeze in more passengers - Omaha.com
Published Wednesday, October 16, 2013 at 1:00 am / Updated at 5:12 pm
New seats let airlines squeeze in more passengers
A look at how various airlines are changing the seats on their planes.

ALASKA AIRLINES

Alaska Airlines is adding an extra row of seats throughout its fleet, which is all Boeing 737s. It's planning to add power outlets at each seat, a rarity among U.S. airlines.

AMERICAN AIRLINES

It's adding five seats on its MD-80s in a project due to wrap up in November. American is still considering whether to add an additional row on its Boeing 737s.

DELTA AIR LINES

Delta is putting slimline seats on many of its planes, including its MD-90s, Boeing 737s, 747s and some 757s. Those seats allow Delta to add an extra row on some of those planes.

JETBLUE AIRWAYS

JetBlue plans to replace the seats on its Airbus A320s — the bulk of its fleet. It hasn't finalized the seat measurements but says it has no plans to add an additional row.

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES

Southwest has added an additional row of seats on most of its fleet. Passengers lost about one inch of legroom, although the airline says that changes to the seat design mean no loss in comfort.

UNITED AIRLINES

New seats going into United Airlines' Airbus A320s are an inch closer together, but the airline says passengers actually have more than an inch of additional space above the knee. It also says the new seats are slightly wider — but the aisles are an inch narrower. United is also putting new seats on most of its Boeing 737s.

US AIRWAYS

No plans for a big seat overhaul, but it added four additional seats on its Airbus A321s, for a total of 187. It fit them in by putting two new seats on each side of a rear exit row.

It's not your imagination. There really is a tighter squeeze on many planes these days.

The big U.S. airlines are taking out old, bulky seats in favor of so-called slimline models that take up less space from front to back, allowing for five or six more seats on each plane.

The changes, covering some of the most common planes flown on domestic and international routes, give the airlines two of their favorite things: more paying passengers, and a smaller fuel bill because the seats are slightly lighter.

Some passengers seem to mind the tighter squeeze more than others. The new seats generally have thinner padding. And new layouts on some planes have made the aisles slightly narrower, meaning beverage carts bump into passengers' shoulders more often.

And this is all going on in coach at a time when airlines are spending heavily to add better premium seats in the front of the plane.

Whether the new seats are really closer together depends on how you measure. By the usual measure, called “pitch,” the new ones are generally an inch closer together from front to back as measured at the armrest.

Airlines say you won't notice. And the new seats are designed to minimize this problem. The seats going onto Southwest's 737s have thinner seatback magazine pockets. Passengers on Alaska Airlines will find slightly smaller tray tables. United's new seats put the magazine pocket above the tray table, getting it away from passengers' knees. And seat-makers saved some space with lighter-weight frames and padding.

This allows airlines to claim that passengers have as much above-the-knee “personal space” as they did before, even if the seats are slightly closer together below the knee.

New seats going into United Airlines' Airbus A320s are an inch closer together from front to back. The new seats Southwest has put on nearly its entire fleet are 31 inches apart, about an inch less than before. In both cases, the airlines were able to add an extra row of six seats to each plane. Southwest went from 137 seats to 143. Both airlines say the new seats are just as comfortable.

United says the new seats make each A320 1,200 pounds lighter. Southwest says the weight savings is cutting about $10 million per year in fuel spending. In addition, the extra seats allow Southwest to expand flying capacity 4 percent without adding any planes, says spokesman Brad Hawkins, while also collecting more revenue from the additional passengers.

At 6-foot-3, Mike Lindsey of Lake Elsinore, Calif., doesn't have another inch to give back to the airlines. He has flown on Southwest several times since it installed the new seats.

“You can't stretch out because of the reduced legroom,” he says. “It's very uncomfortable on anything longer than an hour.”

Southwest flier Joe Strader now takes his billfold out of his pocket before he sits down on a flight because of the thinner cushions. Like Lindsey, he felt as if he sat lower on the new seats.

“The back of the seat in front of you is a little higher and makes you feel like you're sitting down in a hole,” said Strader, who lives near Nashville. Hawkins said that the seat frames are the same height but the thinner cushions might make them seem lower.

Strader did notice one good thing: When the middle seat is empty and you want to put up the armrest and stretch out, the new seats are more comfortable, he says.

Then there are passengers like Ryan Merrill. He says he didn't really notice any difference in the new seats. “I'm used to being packed in like a sardine. I just assume that's never going to change,” he says.

International passengers are feeling crowded, too.

As recently as 2010, most airlines buying Boeing's big 777 opted for nine seats across. Now it's 10 across on 70 percent of new 777s, Boeing says. American's newest 777s are set up 10-across in coach, with slightly narrower seats than on its older 777s.

The extra seat has generally meant skinnier aisles and more bumps from the beverage cart. That's the biggest complaint from travelers, says Mark Koschwitz of SeatExpert.com.

Boeing's new 787 could also be a tighter squeeze in coach. The plane was originally expected to have eight seats across, but United Airlines, the only U.S. carrier currently flying it, went with nine across. Those seats are just 17.3 inches wide. So passengers will have a skinnier seat for United's 12-hour flight from Houston to Lagos on a 787 than on its one-hour flight from Denver to Omaha on a different plane.

Delta Air Lines has already added slimline seats to about one-third of its fleet.

“Increasing density is a priority for us from the perspective of maximizing revenue, but the slimline seats are great because they allow us to do that without sacrificing customers' comfort,” said Michael Henny, Delta's director of customer experience.

Seats from as recently as five years ago weighed almost 29 pounds, said Mark Hiller, CEO of Recaro Aircraft Seating. Its lightest seat now weighs 20. The weight savings comes from things like using plastic armrests instead of metal with a plastic cover, or on some seats replacing the metal pan that holds a passenger's posterior with mesh netting. Also, the new seats have fewer parts, reducing weight and costs.

Airplane seats from 30 years ago looked like your grandmother's BarcaLounger, said Jami Counter, senior director at SeatGuru.com, which tracks airline seats and amenities.

“All that foam cushion and padding probably didn't add all that much comfort. All that's been taken out,” he said. “You haven't really lost all that much if the airline does it right.”

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